EYE DROP USAGE

Eye drops are an integral part of an ophthalmologist’s tool kit.


Using Eye Drops

More common eye drops prescribed or recommended by your doctor include:

  • Dilating eye drops during exams
  • Lubricating eye drops
  • Eye drops to relieve redness
  • Itch-relieving/anti-allergy eye drops
  • Antibiotic eye drops for some infections
  • Numbing eye drops used before surgery
  • Pressure-lowering eye drops used for long-term treatment of glaucoma

When taking any kind of eye drop, you should adhere to these general guidelines:


Listen to Your Doctor
Follow the course of treatment as provided by your ophthalmologist and always consult your doctor if you have any questions. Never put anything in your eye that wasn't designed to be there.

Use the Drops as Recommended
Make sure you use the correct amount of eye drops at the appropriate time. Follow your doctor's instructions for prescription drops and observe the directions on the packaging of over-the-counter eye drops.

Get the Drops in Your Eye
Getting drops into your eye without spilling, missing, or using more than you need can be difficult. Learn how to apply eye drops and seek assistance if necessary. *Always remember to wash your hands before and after applying eye drops

Check out this video on "How to Insert Eye Drops" by EyeSmart — The American Academy of Ophthalmology


Eye Drop Anxiety

Children and people who have strong sensitivities to anything that comes near their eyes may have difficulty applying eye drops. Try these steps if you're having trouble applying eye drops correctly:

  • Lean back in your chair or lie down on a bed or couch as far as you feel comfortable
  • Keep your eyes closed
  • With your thumb and first two fingers, hold the eye drop bottle
  • To keep your balance, place the other two fingers of your hand on your nose
  • Place an eye drop in the corner of your eye near your nose without touching the bottle to your eyelid
  • Keep your head tilted back and open your eyes and blink several times until the drop rolls into your eye

Still Having Trouble?

  • Enlist the help of a family member, a neighbor, or a friend to assist you in inserting the drops using the alternate method outlined above
More information about eye drops can be found at The American Academy of Ophthalmology.

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